Please note that the House and Manor Restaurant will be closed this Wed 20 – Fri 22 October. The grounds remain open for visitors.

Aviary with bedding and visitors
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Aviary garden

Found a short distance from the Manor is the beautifully restored Aviary, surrounded by intricate raised ribbon bedding. Each year in spring and summer we change the plants and colour scheme.

Those who visit us frequently might be surprised at the appearance of some areas of the Garden. Waddesdon is investing in a more sustainable horticultural and garden management plan, reducing waste, replanting bulbs, using green manures and dedicating vast areas of the grounds to wildflower meadows.

We are in a period of transition and while the gardens may not be as polished as in previous years, they are healthier, more environmentally friendly and are gearing up for some incredible late summer colour.

Read more about the changes in the gardens

Currently planted with tropical plants

Aviary bedding

Intricate bedding

The Aviary garden was restored in 2004 to its colourful Victorian appearance with raised ribbon bedding – plants of a single colour and texture planted in tiers or ‘ribbons’ one above the other.

The bedding scheme is changed twice a year in spring and summer. In spring you’re likely to see beautiful displays of coloured tulips, surrounded by smaller bedding plants.

In the late summer this year, look out for bold and colourful planting. The theme will be ‘birds of paradise’ linking the birds in the Aviary to the garden bedding.

Aviary garden

Aviary Glade

This part of the garden is a beautiful wide open space, perfect for picnics and family fun. We also hold some of our larger events in Aviary Glade, such as Colourscape in May half-term, Summer Fest in July and our annual Chilli Fest in September.

Fun fact

We look after over 100 acres of lawn and grassland - the equivalent to cutting 100 football pitches the size of Wembley Stadium.

Mike Buffin, Gardens Manager

Watch the story of the Aviary

Aviaries were an important part of many Rothschild gardens all over Europe in the 19th century. Waddesdon’s cast-iron structure, erected in 1889, is similar to trelliswork pavilions designed for the gardens of Versailles.